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that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
to them. >> a lot to them if you're trying to piece together a college education, not large in terms of the big picture, but because of the sequester, the department of education said that these grants are cut and new grants are cut by 38% across the board. anytime a new grant if it was $5,000 before, it's about $2,000 less than that. >> greta: here is what i don't get. this is almost 40% cut. and 38% cut. explain if the sequester was 2.4% cut across the board, why are the young people taking it at 38%, this cut? how, i would think they would have 2.4%. two things going on the. one it's spread over a shorter period of time. we're halfway into the fiscal year so that 2.4% cut has to actually go into effect over a shorter period of time. >> greta: make it 4.8 or 4.8 then. >> the other thing, there are things in the sequester that are called off making sure the men and women in afghanistan and iraq themselves aren't in harm's way. and vast majority of military spending not cut. so when there are programs that are targeted they take the disproportionate chunk of the hit and that's the po
're given opportunities to fully participate and take advantage of higher education opportunities and that's what the issue is here. this is distinct from fisher vs. the university of texas. >> neil: the argument could be in michigan they said we addressed this grieve vances in inequalities and it's not an issue anymore. >> that's exactly right sandra day o'connor, the last case that was herd, she said in 25 years this may not be necessary, but in the states that have passed these laws, michigan being one of eight -- have decided it's not necessary anymore. the laws giving previous rep shall treatment based on race, ethnicity is not necessary. >> is that the state usurping the federal government? >> that's the argue. >> in california the appeals court has upheld this, which is another reason why the supreme court is going to hear it. you have two pel las courts with different decisions. >> you look at the history. seems as if this is -- was an inorganic movement. you had one of the architects, a big supporter of the california proposition that heather is referring to, who came on out and s
and have sort of a self-directed education that on some foundational level are really important and that's critical thinking i think the best things my own education gave me. i think it's increasingly hard to sort of live up to that ideal, just with the burdens placed on schools today, surrounding standardized testing, and standardized testing is something i have incredibly milked feelings about. i feel like we need to have a way of measuring school progresses and schools that persistently fail kids over years and generations, need to be held accountable to that. but it also makes it very hard for schools to develop and sustain vibrant art programs and music programs and to kind of have the educational offers that reach the appeal of tie versety of kids out there. i don't envy school administrators for having to figure that all out. does that answer your question? >> if you don't hey -- you don't have any further questions, thank you for the great presentation. [applause] >> in 1978, steven hess surveyed 450 journalists covering the federal government for u.s. news organizations. over 30
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
. >> solman: a blogger for the chronicle of higher education, potter has argued that older scholars are clogging the pipeline for the younger ones. the number of ph.d's now far outstrips the number of tenured job openings. >> there's a lot of rage out there about being trained for jobs that you can never have. is it worth keeping younger people out, not giving them the chance to have full-time work, to develop themselves, so that older people can hang on to keep everything we love? >> solman: and these days, even younger people aren't always spring chickens. it's been seven years since 38- year-old joe fruscione earned his ph.d in english from george washington university. he has yet to land a full-time job. >> the market for ph.d's in humanities is almost super- saturated. there have been some positions where i've had to compete with hundreds of applicants who all on paper have roughly the same education and skill sets. >> so fruscione works three part-time gigs. one is running a moby dick discussion group at a washington, d.c. bookstore. >> when you hear moby dick, you think... >>
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
children in elementary school need glasses. educators say 80% of learning depends on a child's ability to see a blackboard or read a book, an impossible burden for 40,000 children here in los angeles who have problems with their vision. >> a lot of times they'll just zone out in the class because they can't see what's going on or they don't fully understand what's being taught. >> good afternoon, express lens up. >> reporter: for vision to learn, the solution is clear. after testing the students, the children's prescriptions are sent here. employees measure, polish and grind out every set of custom lenses. each pair of glasses costs about $100 to make. but for the students, they're free. >> every child should have the tools they need to be successful. and including those tools are glasses. >> reporter: austin butner, a successful investor, founded vision to learn. >> we're taking kids in the school and giving them vision, giving them a chance to learn. >> reporter: one by one, frame by frame, the room comes into focus. >> how excited are you? >> really, really excited. >> reporter: an
. are yourdren responsibility. here in texas we are having to educate $10,000 per child per , and anyway, it is just absolutely ridiculous. all of this is because our government have absolutely refused to close the border all of these years. the country is really getting fed up with it. size,wn in texas of any they have a real organized mexican gang. drugs are coming in. are smugglingw in middle easterners and from all over the world. anyway, the government has cut back on enforcement should not cost americans $160 per day to detain someone. detain them long enough to get a bus to take them back. anti-illegal how immigration groups in arizona met the news last month that people from immigration detention centers were being let go. one phoenix-based group stands with arizona. executive director says that affirmative homeland security was using immigration security as a political weapon. he wrote the shocking, lawless merely to score points on sequestration proved we have said all along, they are far too politicized to be trusted to implement a good deal, or the gang of eight's immigration
on the state, education, general fund. >> new york and california, 100 percent goes to education. most of it is to -- pennsylvania all to senior citizens. veterans affairs, that teach thing. there are some states, like rhode island, where it can go into the general fund and the state can use it as its session. as i said, they have plenty of things to spend it on now. >>heather: so, do you think more states will consider having the lottery? >> they don't have any money. they are either going to raise taxes which is not popular at all or cut spending and they are doing all of those things. this has proven to be such a huge money maker for states. it's $20 billion more in just a few years they is earned. it is a lot of money. >>heather: you mention the payout of $4 2 billion in prize money and that was included because we were all offer it, and the payout included $587 million powerball jackpot in 2012 and now we have $338 million and already this year in 2013. >> but the winners do not get all that money. uncle sam takes his and it depends whether you take a lump sum. 80 percent choose t
a complaint that led to a federal investigation by the department of education into how the university handles and reports rape cases. what do you think the investigation is going to find here? >> they're going to find there is a pervasive culture of sexual assault where the university is acted with deliberate indifference. >> reporter: if an administrator tells a student rape is like football, what does that tell you about the culture here? >> well, i'm not going to comment on any specific case but i think that it absolutely needs to be the case that our administrators respond in a way that is supportive and fair to all the parties involved in these incidents. >> reporter: holdon thorpe is the chancellor of unc. the federal probe comes amid new outrage on the chapel hill campus over a case before the student run honor court. a young woman unsuccessfully sought punishment for an exboyfriend she claims sexually abused her. instead, she ended up facing honor court charges of intimidation. what do you say to these women who say that the system here filed them? >> well, we're supportive of our stu
, how far do you go if it's really for the kids, how far do you go? >> it's about education. it's good they don't have the commercials on tv but bocks behind the counter. some of these places in new york. it's so small, i don't know where they put it. they have to put the candy bars up there. i don't know. >> i agree, where do you draw the line. >> and candy bars, where do you stop? got to hide the candy bars too. >> with the cigarettes. >> there you go. >> everyone seems to appreciate a good implosion here or there. >> why not savor the moment by dragging it out a little bit longer. >> all right. it only took a few seconds for this historic bridge to vanish, huge puff of smoke, we showed it to you yesterday, it's awesome because of the camera work and angle. catch it out again. the camera catches the explosives ripping through the 80-year-old span. it was caught by kurt and mike from austin, they did it with a camera at 300 frames per second. >> are we going to see it crumbling down? >> it crumbles so slowly. >> here we go, here we go. >> you can tell how slow it's going, because you
and educational. but it's a great show. >> i could go on. we have to leave it there. because let's talk health insurance. this is something that got all of us talking this morning. give us personal medical information or pay hundreds of dollars. this is the message from cvs to its employees now. is it an invasion of privacy, is it fair business practice? we'll weigh in on that next. [ together ] i had a break-in. we were out when it happened. by the time we called the police, there wasn't much they could do. i felt so helpless. we were out when it happened, but adt quickly called the police. i felt like it was over right away. feels like it's still not over. we lost our digital photos, financial records -- things that insurance simply can't replace. [ male announcer ] you can't predict when bad things will happen, but you can help protect yourself with the fast alarm response of adt. we're always there for your family. with more monitoring centers, more ways to keep up with life at home, and 24/7 monitoring against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide, starting at just over $1 a
mean weapons for the jordanians, and over the long term what it means is helping with the education of jordanian citizens. it means even my own view is a lot could be done in the intermediate term by american programs that would educate jordanian children so they learned english and so they could operate computers, so that they could use the internet. jenna: to engage on different levels throughout the generations of that country. "the washington post" has come out with an article today that questions whether or not the obama administration has a contingency plan two years into this conflict. the administration has been vague about what they want to do if a red line is crossed with chemical weapons or what the plan is moving forward. do you think that is because they don't want to release the plan to the public because it's classified or do you think they maybe don't have a plan? >> i hope it's because they don't want to release it to the public. i worry that they haven't formulated one. we always have to understand in the middle east, and i think it's taken the obama administratio
minister. western educated communications executive so reports the associated press. it manage his or her spent decades living in texas before recently moving to turkey his son is reportedly fighting with the rebels inside syria this is all part of the coalition opposition first effort to provide services to people who live inside syria. until now the council has largely operated outside the country working to boost support for the rebels fighting to take out the syrian about the bashar assad casey anthony hasn't said much since the jury found her not guilty of murdering her daughter caylee. she should be able to sell her story to pay back some the debt. this is brand new from last week. expert witness says he knows why jody areas cannot remember a lot from the day she stabbed her ex-boyfriend 27 times. slit his throat and shot him dead. apparently killing someone can give you amnesia. that's coming up. gotcha ! got you ! you cannot escape the rebel forces ! ahhh. got you ! got ya ! gotcha ! got . that's all you got, brother ? take that. never having to surrender the things that matter. g
the opportunities that maybe more well educated people have. i blame congress in some way, to leaving these people out in the cold. i think there say lesson here. like in sex ed class, they have kids carry around babies so they know what it is like, baby dolls, so they know what it is like to take care of a baby. i think congress should have to carry around 20 something dolls. and if the doll goes below the poverty line, they have to listen to a lecture by nancy pelosi. that's my idea. >> i was waiting, trying to understand where you were going. i'm kind of with you. but actually to your point, this is something i read in this article in the wall street journal, to your point about maybe feeling disenfranchised. many whose jobs do not give them membership in the professional class turn to a traditional source of young adult identity, parenthood, for meaning, for satisfaction, so young women often drift unintentionally into parenthood with men whom they believe are not good enough to marry or not ready for it. so there is a trend here, and it is tougher for middle class americans, but then you look
around and raise their children, me saying families and cultures should focus on education is not radical or revolutionary it's the [bleep] truth. you are the system gavin newsome, fix the system. but you won't fix the system because you know he what it takes to fix the system and you are [bleep] coward. guys like huffington post, you guys [bleep] line up behind me these people. you have blood on your hands because the problem could be fixed. >> bill: joining us from l.a. is adam carolla. you weren't surprised that the left-wing media would brand you a racist. that's what they do to everyone who is critical of the minority community or the gay community or anybody perceived to be vulnerable if you criticize them. then they attack you personally. you know that. >> sure. >> as a matter of fact, if the huffington post was around, they would have called the doctor who discovered sickle cell a racist. that's just what they do. and my point is there is a problem, i would like to look at the problem, honestly and attempt to solve it, but we can't solve it if you are calling everyone who is attem
and our educational institutions is our attention to the poor and the social justice. he has taken name francis, the apostle of the poor, and has talked about the poor and marginalized ever since he started. i think the theme of poverty and taking care of the poor and as he said on sunday, a church of the poor and for the poor is going to be a theme of his papacy. >> by the way, father martin, i have joe in the second round of the tournament. claudio, you mentioned the dramatic gesture there of the pope getting out of the motorcade and working the crowd like that. i just think the inaugural parade here in the united states when jimmy carter broke with tradition, got out and backed down pennsylvania. how dramatic that was. does that say anything about how the relationship of this pope, with catholic worldwide will be different than the relationship benedict had with them? >> indeed it is. the pope breaks with the rules and breaks with tradition and vatican security as well. on sunday, for instance, he was holding a small mass inside the small parish inside the vatican walls. of course, t
get board of education busy. president obama made his march madness picks today. is he going with a final four of louisvilleville, florida, ohio state, an eventual champion indiana. >> republicans were not amused by this. the rnc put out an ad. louisiana congressman remarked his final four picks are are now late but his budget is late by 45 days. i think that shows the priorities. his final four picks actually made it on time. since the demands on our time are not nearly as important, the panel and i have come up with our own final four picks. all right, mara, who do you have? >> i wanted to give steve my proxy on this since i don't follow college basketball. i did ask around at work and came up coincidently with the exact same for the president picked. i cannot defend them or describe how we did this in any way, shape are or form. diver to my better here. >> i have louisville, wisconsin, michigan and indiana. three of the four teams are big ten teams. best conference in basketball. indiana beating wisconsin in the final. >> bret: okay. charles? >> marah echoing obama again.
prospects you would like. not the education you like. as adults, they're very likely to smoke if they smoke as kid, and that will shorten their lives. so smoking is a very big deal. at the new york city ban smoking, which we got a lot of grief about, i will say. i got a lot of one-fingered ways as i would describe them when i marched by bars on st. patrick's day, for example. today, marched by a bar in st. patrick's day, and everybody seems to love you. and because of what new york did, i think it's fair to say most cities in america, all of western europe, virtually all of latin america have now gone smoke-free. >> sir, i know you reject the "nanny" label. you consider yourself a health advocate. you heard in the piece that introduced you, there is something of a backlash to the oversized soda ban, or restriction. do you think that it's possible that your actions when it comes to oversized sodas, sugary drinks, have created a backlash that could end up ultimately hurting your cause? you see what's going on in mississippi, for example. >> oh, no, anything but -- jake, anything but the bever
to listen to the message you have about the economy, about health care, about education. because they're so turned off by the rhetoric about illegal immigration. and that i think is what ari and the republican party is talking about now. >> so john berman has covered politics for a gazillion years. richard, you are my nonpolitico. are you moved? is there a sense of a relaunch? >> i'm the type of person that i'm to be persuaded, right some but to me, i know especially this 18 to 29 group, i just feel like it seems like marketing. and i hear the word brand and to me that makes it seem that it's not authentic. so i think social issues, but this idea of the package and -- it just seems like a branding and a marketing thing and i think a lot of young people are pretty wise to that sort of approach. >> so let's go right back then to jake. when you look at the cpac, right, and the straw poll that came out of that, you had rand paul winning with 25%, right behind was marco rubio, something like 23%. and you had contra ticker to me contradictory messages. again, polar opposites on the state of the r
tibbetts who helps girls' education in developing countries. so the four of them, you can go on the dvt awards and you can read about them, you can listen to their videos. and then please vote, because the more votes we have, i feel is fair ir it is. >> and i have to say i've gone online and i haven't been able to vote yet because i can't decide. but i will. >> i'm not going to say who i voted for, but i did vote. >> this has always been a passion project of yours. >> yes, the awards is a wonderful thing and the people's award is nice because we can contribute and have -- everybody vote in and i like that. i like to see how many votes there are. butky mention the leadership award? can i mention that we have a leadership award, lifetime 4r5ed leadership award that one year we gave to hillary. and one year to oprah. and this year, it's going to robin roberts. >> oh, that is very. [ applause ] that's very sweet. very sweet. >> and the best thing is when i e-mailed her and i said would you accept this, and she said, i've been offered many awards and i say no to everyone, but i say yes to yo
customer. >> that's the absolutely right thing to do. a lack of education is terrible and doesn't bode well for a great financial future. >> alisyn: by the time they're ten years old. it's time to talk about interest, loan, time horizon and inflation, and taxes. what is that? >> now we're getting the bigger words here, alisyn. interest, the money that you paid for them. anybody lending you money, the loan when you borrow money for things like a car and teenagers may need a loan if they're getting close to those times and inflation, just that things get more costly over time and you have to, obviously, account for that in taxes and we're all familiar with those. >> alisyn: so you're explaining all this have to your ten-year-old, even if it's not applicable to their life yet. you're telling them what's on the horizon. >> exactly. >> alisyn: let's talk about 15 years old and this is where i think things get serious and you have the baby-sitting money and you have some stuff that you want to buy. so, you say investing, allocation asset. diversification, stock funds. >> i'm so happy we're doing
taxes, limited regulation. job creation, pension reform, education reform. this is working and it's getting results for people and that's what people want. they want government to work well and stay out of their way and spend their money wisely and that's what governors do. martha: that is one of the big questions. reince priebus talked about reaching out to groups like the naacp and la raza and there is an editorial this morning in "the national review" which disagrees with that notion. says no. actually what conservatives need to do is prove to hispanics why they have a better way of helping people of helping the middle class. what do you think? >> i don't think those are inconsistent. we need to stick to our principles. if we become more like the democratic party, they don't need us. we have bright colors that reagan talked about which is what we stand for on taxes, regulation, spending life, family. marriage, other things like that, that are pillars of the republican party. but then i think they're right. show people of all ethnicities, of income stratus, show why the principl
in jobs, education, housing and get this economy back on track. we don'tg to make sure go into this or don't continue with the state of perpetual war. host: let's talk about the budget issues. president obama on the hill last democrats g to house from bloomberg's reporting he all of you to agree to entitlement changes to medicare saying it iscurity better to make the changes when office rather n than a republican. what was your reaction? guest: first, no benefit cuts. the bottom line for myself. no cuts in social security, medicare.nd they are benefits that one works for all of their lives or either disabled or can't work for whatever reason. so, we owe this to the american people. when you talk about reform and medicare and medicaid, social medicare for example, we could allow for more for prescription drugs. that would achieve cost savings. achieve many ways to savings without cutting benefits. the formulas that would cut i do not support. host: what about raising 65igibility for medicare from -- guest: no, i do not support that. when you look at many people in sectors and industrial s
not have had to fight at home that they could have used to start their own business or educate themselves beyond what the g.i. bill did. there's such a drag that it's almost uncharitable. here's what i would like to ask you real quick, if you can. caller: ok. hal: i don't know what time line you were there but it would seem -- caller: my first tour was 2005, another in 2006 and another in 2007 before we started wrapping up. hal: i don't know what your experience was or perhaps other soldiers, but i'm curious as to the day after the mission accomplished speech and banner, what it was like to be a soldier on the ground there going we're not leaving this isn't over. caller: i'll give you a real good example of that. it lamb was heartbreaking. when i was stationed there, i was in one of the worst places to be. to be graphic, the day that he gave game over speech, everything's all good, i literally lost a friend who was pretty much had his head cut off. he drove down the street in the al-qaeda al-qaeda was using piano wire, springing it up to decapitate drivers. i lost my best friend that way
these were wonderful very educated professional people that just had a culture and ideology that we can't get. >> hal: ultimately -- that's -- the unfortunate part of holding on to an argumentative point of view beyond the solution itself. and that's why a lot of major, positive changes are generational. because bigotry is harder to pass on to your kid if they don't have a material reason for the bigotry. once the law is passed and there can be no -- they can no longer be slaves it's harder for his son to argue that point because he no longer has people forced to work below them. four or five generations down the line it gets harder and harder to beat that into your kid's head. and you are finding the youth of israel and the iranian youth -- look at who was running in the streets? they were wearing rocking republic jeans they were -- and the majority of that country because of the amount of warring that was going on are like barely 30 now at the oldest because of how many people were killed and the jasmine revolution as it's called the up rising in the middle east
months ago for demanding the girls in her country be educated. the 15-year-old talked about her first day back in class. >> i think it is the happiest moment that i'm going back to my school. and today i will have my books, my bag and i will talk to my friends. i'll talk to my teacher. >> wonderful outlook. she's been getting medical treatment in birmingham, england. >> it's so nice to see her going back to school. exactly what she wants to do. >>> it is first day of spring, believe it or not. but not for big part of the country. next we go live where winter weather is still causing major problems this morning. (announcer) make mornings special, with fancy feast mornings gourmet cat food. mornings are delicious protein rich entrees with gardes fancy feast mornings. the best ingredient is love. you know who you are. you can part a crowd, without saying a word... if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... you stash tissues like a squirrel stashes nuts... well muddlers, muddle no more. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zy
to educate our youth. when 6 million people die and 20-year-olds don't understand that's a symbol of the atrocity. >> i'm not sure what the punishment should be but a lifetime ban when you're 20 -- >> if he traveled somewhere else do you think they will welcome him? >> he might be in danger. i don't know. >> that was the anniversary of some of the atrocities as it relays. >>> last minute i have. kate middleton is pregnant. have you heard that >> no. >> she was speaking to a soldier at an event over the weekend, the duchess of cambridge and said she does not know what sex baby she's having but that she's hoping for a boy. all right. should she have said that? >> don't know i believe she said that. >> because of the last videotape? should a mother ever say that? >> why not? >> you do wish much >> i was sitting here think field goal i could adopt a child i would adopt a girl. i want a little girl. >> when you hear people say that and the other sex comes out they go i'm so thrilled. i don't think it should be headlines. if she has a girl the child kate did not want. >> a little girl c
much. that was unbelievably educational. >> this is a family friendly segment carson. >> you want me as guest host for a week. >> indulge. >> i feel like i'm in the movie "the hangover." >> tomorrow it will be that way. >> coming up carson actually if he's sober will test our knowledge of "the voice" two new judges who is going to win? i say me. >> can i have a sip? >> please. >> i'm a chicken, no. >> more for me. >> happy easter. >> thank you very much. >> happy easter, we'll be right back. ♪ [ chuckles ] isn't easter fun, red? [ grunts ] not from my perspective! ♪ introducing thets. lifter foundation from maybelline new york. our first lifting foundation with smoothing primer swirled inside. beyond covering helps restore smoothness, elasticity. for younger-looking skin instantly. the lifter. ♪ maybe it's maybelline ♪ 'cause germs don't stick on me ♪ [ female announcer ] band-aid brand has quiltvent technology with air channels to let boo boos breathe. [ giggles ] [ female announcer ] quiltvent technology, only from band-aid brand. use with neosporin first aid antibiotic.
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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